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Is It Wrong To Leave Your Phone Charging Overnight?

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Oct. 8, 2019, 11:52 p.m.


There are a lot of questions about cell phone batteries. Should you leave your smartphones plugged in overnight? Is it bad for the phone? Bad for your safety? What’s the right thing to do?

In fact, how much should you charge your phone? When’s the right time to plug in? Should it go down to 0 per cent every time? Up to 100 per cent? How do you get the longest life out of the battery inside a smartphone?

The debate goes well beyond the worry of moderate harm to a device, as some people have fears of “overloading” a smartphone battery. T

hat worry seems relatively justified since it was only a few years ago that Samsung’s Galaxy Note 7s were bursting into flame due to battery issues. But as we’ve explained before, unless a device has some serious manufacturing defects as that phone did, the fire-in-your-pocket (or on the nightstand) aspect is unlikely.

The one thing all the experts agree upon is that smartphones are smart enough that they do not let an overload happen. Extra protection chips inside make sure that can’t happen in a tablet or smartphone or even a laptop. Once the internal Lithium-ion battery hits 100 per cent of its capacity, charging stops. That usually happens within an hour or two, tops.

However, if you leave the smartphone plugged in overnight, it’s going to use a bit of energy constantly trickling new juice to the battery every time it falls to 99 per cent. That is eating into your phone’s lifespan but don’t worry about this too much.

Plug the phone in (or place on the wireless charger) when you go to sleep; if you wake up sometime in the night, unplug it/move it to prevent constant trickle-charging.

Potential problems that could be encountered while charging overnight:

1) It is hot in here? The trickle-charge can cause some heating up. Many experts recommend taking a phone fully out of the case to charge overnight. At the very least, do NOT stack a bunch of crap like books or other devices on top of a charging device. And for the love of Jobs, don’t put it under your pillow. Do any of the above and you can expect the phone to get hot—not necessarily enough for spontaneous combustion, but at least enough to damage the battery

 

2) Bad Cables. If you’re using a knock-off cable that isn’t from the manufacturer, or at least “certified” in some way (iPhone Lightning cables should be MFi certified, for example), it could be a problem. The cord and connectors may not be up to the specifications needed for the phone or tablet.

This is why you shouldn’t but fake cables.

Now any time someone tells you about charging your phones overnight, you hit them with all thee facts.

Source: PCmag.com

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